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Yasp-Scripted (Systemmonitor) v1.0.8a

   1.0.8a  

Plasmoid Binary

Score 86%
Yasp-Scripted (Systemmonitor) v1.0.8a
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Yasp-Scripted (Systemmonitor) v1.0.8a
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Yasp-Scripted (Systemmonitor) v1.0.8a
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Minimum required   KDE 4.x
Downloads:  10526
Submitted:  Jul 31 2009
Updated:  Feb 25 2011

Description:

Yes, Yet another systemmonitor plasmoid.
But still different from the others.
The only useful plasmoid systemmonitor i have found was Yasp. The problem with it was that it was not configurable enough.
So I came up with the idea, that everyone has its own imaginations of what belongs into a systemmonitor and what not. The birth of Yasp-scripted.
The name is similar to Yasp, because I use some modified code from that project.
The biggest advantage is that you can add things to the monitor or remove some, by just changing the script file and reparse it again...) No recompilation or something like that needed...
The scriptfile which comes with this applet is a scriptfile which fits exactly my system. You probably need to change it to fit your system (e.g. if you do not have a wireless lan card, you need to remove the wlan stuff from the script file).

You can send me your script, such that I can upload a whole bunch of scripts, the user could choose of later (maybe with a screenshot to see directly what the script does)

The scripts can be found in the directory yasp_scripts.
The 1st screenshot is systemmonitor_by_mtr.script, the 2nd screenshot is systemmonitor_by_patkoscsaba.script
and the 3rd screenshot is the script collection by duncan
(thx for the scripts).

If you want to align things, you should either use a monospace font, or use a \t in the value.

If you are familiar with svg you maybe will create your own svg's for the bar-meter. Send them please to me to have a wider range of look and feel for the system monitor ;)




Changelog:

1.0.8a - wrong folder prefix ;)

1.0.8 - bug fixed when reparsing (the kde-plasma-handle was deleted, but we should not delete it)

1.0.7 - bug fixed if engine-sensors contains a colon
- Added script by joseph (thx for the script)
- New script by aldo (thx for the script)

1.0.6 - stack keyword added to plotter (thx Chris99 for the patch)
- Script by mtr added (thx for the script)

1.0.5 - fix crash on reparsing in kde-4.5.2 (with 4.5.2 reparsing works again, but 4.5.1 and 4.5.0 have a bug)

1.0.4
- Label preferredSize setting correctly + sizePolicy changed

1.0.3
- meter sizePolicy changed (works now better in KDE-4.5)
- bugfix for KDE-4.5 such that it does not crash on removal

1.0.2
- workaround for problems with KDE-4.5 and meters (min_height parameter added)
- added script by aldo to the package (italian labels)
(- known issue: yasp-scripted crashes on reparsing in kde-4.5. This will be fixed in a later release)

1.0.1 - bug fixed if yasp is closed while parsing the script

1.0: - Reparsing should be more stable




LicenseGPL
Source(Yasp-Scripted v1.0.8a)
Arch(Arch Linux PKGBUILD)
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 1.0.8 spelling error

 
 by rangerGR on: Feb 25 2011
 
Score 50%

You have named the folder yasp-scripte instead of yasp-scripted.

Not big deal, but my PKGBUILD failed till I fixed it ;)

Thanks for the update


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 Re: 1.0.8 spelling error

 
 by finkandreas on: Feb 25 2011
 
Score 50%

Thx for report, I uploaded a 1.0.8a.
Unfortunately I had to pick a new version, coz kde-look.org does not allow to replace with the same filename...


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.

 Re: Re: 1.0.8 spelling error

 
 by rangerGR on: Feb 25 2011
 
Score 50%

That was quick
Thanks again


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 yasp-scripted 1.0.8a

 
 by 64BitRulz on: Mar 1 2011
 
Score 50%

Hi,

First, thanks for a great plasmoid it's been working well for weeks. Now, suddenly, it cannot parse systemmonitor:partitions/root/freespace:value and simply freezes at this point. The same line for systemmonitor:partitions/home works fine which appears after this in the script. I am simply commenting out the root entries for now. Any ideas why this might be happening? I can't think of anything that has changed on my system.
Thanks in advance.


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 Re: yasp-scripted 1.0.8a

 
 by finkandreas on: Mar 1 2011
 
Score 50%

I have no idea what happened there.
Can you start plasmaengineexplorer and check the systemmonitor dataengine? That's a good starting point to find the cause of your problem.


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 Re: Re: yasp-scripted 1.0.8a

 
 by 64BitRulz on: Mar 3 2011
 
Score 50%

Thanks for the suggestion. I have been playing around with plasma engine explorer as you suggested. I see no entry in the partitions list for / or root only home and backup which I am able to read. How do I get it to see the / or root partition? Any idea why it could previosly see it but now cannot?
TIA
Dave


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 Re: Re: Re: yasp-scripted 1.0.8a

 
 by finkandreas on: Mar 3 2011
 
Score 50%

The systemengine is part of KDE and not part of yasp-scripted. I have no idea why it does not recognize your root partition anymore, but your home partition is recognized correctly.
Maybe you find sth in the kde bugzilla (search for systemmonitor dataengine), and if nothing is there, you could file a bug there.

I have no idea, why it does not work for you, but you could workaround it, by using the command "df" and parse the output...


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 Re: yasp-scripted 1.0.

 
 by DuncanKDE on: Mar 3 2011
 
Score 50%

It's a bit of a long shot as I'm not sure this info is affected and I'd normally think not, but... Did you possibly update your kernel recently?

The kernel folks have been strengthening "information leak" protections due to potential security issues recently (2.6.38, possibly 2.6.37), with the specific behavior being that certain values now appear as zero unless queried by root. I don't /know/ that partition sizes are affected, but it's possible.

Does running the "df" command from a shell (konsole window) report usable values? What about if you run it as root (su/sudo/whatever)? If a root df returns valid info but a user df only returns valid info for /home, not /, then we've found the problem -- stricter permissions on the / data. There should be a kernel option available to loosen those restrictions if indeed that's the problem. If not...


Duncan
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 Re: Re: yasp-scripted 1.0.

 
 by 64BitRulz on: Mar 3 2011
 
Score 50%

Hi Duncan

I am running kernel 2.6.37.2-15-desktop which comes from the Tumbleweed repository on openSUSE 11.3. The df command shows the following:
dave@opensuse113:~> df
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda4 243668872 89560596 141730600 39% /media/backup
/dev/sdb1 240362656 76351556 151801300 34% /home
dave@opensuse113:~> sudo df
root's password:
Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda4 243668872 89560596 141730600 39% /media/backup
/dev/sdb1 240362656 76351612 151801244 34% /home

which as you can see is the same for both the normal user and root. However, I will see if I can track down any settings that may affect the lack of / info as you suggest. In the mean time, are you aware of what permissions may be set and where?
Thanks for your input.
Dave


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-

 Missing / remount, perhaps?

 
 by DuncanKDE on: Mar 3 2011
 
Score 50%

As you note, the df for both root and user is the same, so that's not the problem. However, did you note that the / partition is missing there, too?

That suggests one of two things to me. Most likely, the rootfs remount stuff in your initscripts (or possibly simply the /etc/fstab entry for it) is screwed up, so the only root mount is the default rootfs mount, likely read-only, that the kernel does first, before starting any userspace (well, an initramfs/initrd changes that a bit, but anyway...). cat /proc/mounts (mount itself may report invalid info if inittab is stale due to read-only mounted rootfs). There should be TWO entries for /, the generic "rootfs" entry from the initial kernel mount, and if the system's remounting it correctly, a /dev/root entry that lists the real filesystem type (ext4 or whatever, I've used reiserfs here for years and will probably do until I switch to btrfs) and real mount options. If the second entry is missing or has strange mount options listed, that's probably why neither df nor kde can find it.

The other possibility would be some strange interaction with SELinux, AppArmor or similar security mechanism. That's well beyond me and the chance is rather small, but it's there if you're running such things, particularly with SELinux, which few enough people properly understand that most simply turn it off if it starts giving them problems.

I'd bet on the missing remount, tho, so the system doesn't see / in ordered for either df or kde's sysengine to be able to list it.


Duncan
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-

 Re: Missing / remount, perhaps?

 
 by 64BitRulz on: Mar 3 2011
 
Score 50%

Hi Duncan,

Thanks for taking the extra time on this small issue. Unfortunately I'm a little out of my comfort zone at the moment. However:
cat /proc/mounts
rootfs / rootfs rw 0 0
devtmpfs /dev devtmpfs rw,relatime,size=2022132k,nr_inodes=505533,mode=755 0 0
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs rw,relatime 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts rw,relatime,gid=5,mode=620,ptmxmode=000 0 0
/dev/sda1 / ext4 rw,relatime,user_xattr,acl,barrier=1,data=ordered 0 0
proc /proc proc rw,relatime 0 0
sysfs /sys sysfs rw,relatime 0 0
debugfs /sys/kernel/debug debugfs rw,relatime 0 0
obexautofs /mnt/host fuse.obexautofs rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0 0 0
fusectl /sys/fs/fuse/connections fusectl rw,relatime 0 0
/dev/sda4 /media/backup ext4 rw,relatime,user_xattr,acl,barrier=1,data=ordered 0 0
/dev/sdb1 /home ext4 rw,relatime,user_xattr,acl,barrier=1,data=ordered 0 0
obexautofs /mnt/host fuse.obexautofs rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0 0 0
proc /var/lib/ntp/proc proc ro,nosuid,nodev,relatime 0 0

Are the 2 root entries you expect to see there? I think they are from your description but it would be great if you could confirm. I have rebuilt the initrd just in case and rebooted prior to running the cat command above. The situation still remains the same. If I am missing something here then a pointer to the relevant documentation or action I could take to resolve would be great. I really appreciate the time you are taking to assist.
Best regards
Dave



-

 Re: Missing / remount, perhaps?

 
 by 64BitRulz on: Mar 3 2011
 
Score 50%

Hi Duncan

Thanks for all your help. I've actually fixed the issue. It appears it was simply a disparity in a start up script somewhere (don't exactly know where, but not bothered at this point :-) ). I did some more updates from the Tumbleweed repository that I mentioned earlier. This has fixed the issue and all is now functioning as it used to.

Again, many thanks for your help and insights, they actually provided me with the clue as to what may have happened.

Cheers
Dave



-
.

 Installation

 
 by EazyVG on: Mar 17 2011
 
Score 50%

Sorry for a stupid question, but do I install this, I like the 1st one and have openSUSE 11.4 with KDE 4.6.

Second: What I do to refrect quad core cpu info, if you can explain this perhaps the rest I will get it, as used to manually script for superkaramba.

Thank you.


Reply to this

-

 Re: Installation

 
 by DuncanKDE on: Mar 17 2011
 
Score 50%

Installation:

For technical reasons, plasmoid binaries often must be built from sources to work with your specific distribution. That's the case here.

Download (and untar) the tarball, then, as is traditional for source tarballs, there's an INSTALL file included, with instructions. The assumption is that you already have a standard working development toolchain installed, plus cmake, standard for kde. If you don't, you'll likely have to install cmake and gcc, and possibly a few *-devel packages for kde related dependencies. (FWIW, I run Gentoo here, where the assumption is from-source, so such things are normally installed already, but I ran Mandrake 2001-2004, and remember well having to install various extra *-devel packages if I wanted to do anything from source.)

Yasp-scripted vs. superkaramba:

You mention that you're already familiar with superkaramba. =:^) That's a *huge* bonus, and yasp-scripted scripts should in fact look quite familiar indeed, as you'll quickly discover that yasp-scripted is in practice a mini-karamba, very similar, but with a rather simpler and thus somewhat less powerful syntax.

Which brings up the logical question: Since plasma natively supports superkaramba themes and you already understand it, why would you be interested in the simpler but less powerful yasp-scripted, given that it requires building and installing an additional plasmoid while superkaramba support is plasma-builtin, and yasp-scripted is in fact less powerful? (Yasp-scripted doesn't yet support theme/script nesting, for instance, and lacks superkaramba's positioning language features, so positioning is vertical-only, controlled by the order in the script. The horizontal positioning in the third screenshot (from me), is because I'm running multiple yasp-scripted plasmoids, lined up in a row on the same panel.)

Here, I used kde3's ksysguard to track system performance, and found the kde4 version buggy and unsuitable for the purpose, so when I switched to kde4, I needed something quickly to fill the gap. I researched superkaramba and in fact will probably upgrade to it eventually, but found its learning curve a bit too steep for immediate use when I switched. Yasp-scripted, having a simpler scripting language but still powerful enough to do the reporting I needed and more, was the easier "quick" solution, and I expect having learned it will greatly help when I upgrade to superkaramba. So it worked great for me and I in turn have tried to help others with it here as I can.

But I don't really understand what it would offer to someone already comfortable with superkaramba, especially since superkaramba support is already native to plasma, just (script if necessary and) install the appropriate theme, while yasp-scripted requires the additional binary plasmoid build and install, as well.

But since I'm coming from the yasp-scripted side, perhaps I'm missing something. Thus I'm not just asking the question for you, but for me too, as I always considered superkaramba the ultimate solution, for those who knew it, both because I believe it more powerful, and because of its native plasma support. If you see something in yasp-scripted that superkaramba can't do, I'd definitely like to know about it, as it could change my viewpoint and ultimate goal to learn superkaramba substantially.

Runtime script configuration:

As with superkaramba, yasp-scripted (mostly) simply provides a framework for the the graphical display and reporting of various scripted elements. A key thing to remember with both superkaramba and yasp-scripted is that neither one create their reports "out of thin air" as it were; they both require the data to be available elsewhere in the system. All they do is take that data from elsewhere, massage it a bit for graphical presentation, and then present it in the form chosen by the script/theme author.

You ask specifically about quad-core CPU info. I don't know as you didn't say, whether you're thinking about core-temps (°), simple use vs idle (%), more complex user/system/nice/wait/total vs idle (%), cpufreq (MHz/GHz), or... but all these are available on various system sensors if so configured for your system, and thus available to be presented by yasp-scripted and superkaramba. At least yasp-scripted (IDR for superkaramba) exposes some of these from the ksysguard/kde-systemmonitor engine... these are the same values available in ksysguard/kde-systemmonitor, with availability conditional on it understanding how to get them. However, that's just arguably the simplest method of getting the numbers. If the ksysguard/kde-systemmonitor engine doesn't understand the numbers, yet they're available as text elsewhere in the system, say from the "sensors" or "acpi" commands at the CLI and/or as exposed in files located in /proc or /sys, they're still available to yasp-scripted (and I believe superkaramba), which can take the STDOUT of various commands or command-pipes (using grep/sed/awk/cut/head/tail/etc as necessary), do math on it if necessary, and present the formatted output as text or as bar or line graphs.

What method you use to get that info will to some extent be system-specific, but you can check the scripts in the "duncan" subdir for how I got both temps and detailed user/system/nice/wait/total percentages, on my dual dual-core main system (dual Opteron 290s, each dual-core). The third screenshot includes the output from these scripts.

Since then, I've setup similar scripts on my Atom based netbook, line-graphing and text-reporting CPUFreq, which wasn't applicable on my main system. I also graph and text-report on battery status, if that's of any interest. But I've not turned that in, so ask if you're interested in that.

So while the answer is somewhat system-specific, you've a good likelihood of being able to grok it and figure out what changes you need for your system, if any, from one of the existing sample scripts... *PROVIDED* the numbers are either exposed in the ksysguard/kde-systemmonitor engine, or that you grok bash scripting well enough to figure out what's going on in the sample scripts and modify it as necessary. If you don't understand bash and it's not available in the ksysguard/kde-systemmonitor engine, then it'll be tough figuring out. But if you're familiar with superkaramba, you still might manage to do it, with a bit of muddling.


HTH =:^)
Duncan

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-

 Problem with kde 4.6.2

 
 by Droopy159 on: Apr 6 2011
 
Score 50%

Well, it used to work fine with kde 4.6.1. I've just upgrade to kde 4.6.2 nad when reparsing i've got the message "Wainting for : RootUsed" and stay frozen...
Anybody else ??? What's wrong with kde 4.6.2 ???


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-

 Re: Problem with kde 4.6.2

 
 by finkandreas on: Apr 7 2011
 
Score 50%

I think KDE-4.6.2 screwed up something. Watching the sensors with plasmaengineexplorer there is no systemmonitor:partitions/root/usedspace:value. The best you can do: Write a bugreport to KDE (and change your script in the meanwhile to not show used disk space, until it's fixed in kde)


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.

 Re: Re: Problem with kde 4.6.2

 
 by dnarol on: Jan 14 2012
 
Score 50%

In KDE 4.6.5 for root partitions usedspace, use systemmonitor:partitions//usedspace:value instead of systemmonitor:partitions/root/usedspace:value and it works.


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-

 RootUsed

 
 by tovarishStepanov on: Apr 10 2011
 
Score 50%

Could you please help? How to fix this "waiting for: RootUsed" (after update to kde 4.6.2)?


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 Re: RootUsed

 
 by tovarishStepanov on: Apr 10 2011
 
Score 50%

Sorry, forgot to search on the page.


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-

 HomeUsed

 
 by siavash8 on: May 6 2011
 
Score 50%

For me, only one of the scripts works: the one from joseph. The rest are stuck at Waiting for: HomeUsed or Waiting for: CPU0 Temp. lm-sensors is configured correctly. What should I do?


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-

 Re: HomeUsed

 
 by DuncanKDE on: May 6 2011
 
Score 50%

> For me, only one of the scripts works

That's because the scripts are all example scripts. They aren't really designed to be run as-is, unless you have exactly the same hardware setup as the person who authored the script. The idea is to customize them to your own hardware, partitions, etc.

There's typically two ways to get the data from your system into the script to be displayed -- two different types of "sensors" (the third listed in the README.syntax file is simply a math sensor that manipulates data already available from other sensors).

The first (second in the readme) type of sensor uses kde's existing plasma:dataengine, most frequently the systemmonitor engine. But what that engine exposes for use depends on what it can find in your system.

The second (first in the readme) type of sensor often requires a bit more work, but is *FAR* more flexible, because it simply takes the STDOUT of a (normally CLI mode command or command-pipe, making it available thru the sensor, for display via one of the text or graphic display elements yasp-scripted makes available for use by your yasp-script.

Thus, any output you can get to appear either on the command-line or via kde's systemmonitor engine, you can get yasp-scripted to display (obviously assuming generating that output doesn't require interactivity -- that it can be scripted, of course).

What this normally involves for lm_sensors output is running the command in the shell to see what the output you're looking for looks like, then piping that result to grep/sed/cut/awk/head/tail/etc to format it the way you need for the yasp-scripted sensor. (Typically, this will involve grepping a specific line of the output, then cutting/seding/grepping that down to just the number, either for formatted text/graphic display directly, or to be plugged into yasp-scripted's math functions to for instance turn KB into MB or GB, or to divide a value by the total possible to get a percentage for graphic.)

The shipped scripts do this already, but by definition, they measure statistics on the specific hardware that the author had. You can either modify the examples for your hardware, or you can use them as illustrations when creating your own.

In this way, yasp-scripted is very powerful, because it can be made to display whatever stats your system has available, *BUT*, it's also not a simple install and run plasmoid. It's designed for the power user, the user already familiar enough with his system and the command line, to know both what sort of information he wants, and how to use the traditional UNIX tools and shell scripting to get it in the form she wants. People who don't have the required skills will therefore find the this plasmoid pretty much worthless, because they won't know how to get it to display what they want it to display, not even to the point of modifying the existing scripts for their own system.


Duncan
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 Re: Re: HomeUsed

 
 by siavash8 on: May 6 2011
 
Score 50%

Thank you very much for the quick and complete response. I'll try to make it work. Thank you.


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