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- Poll . 

Where is MS Windows better than KDE/Linux?


Posted by Yaba on Jan 18 2004
Look and Feel5%5%5% 5%
Customizability/Flexibility3%3%3% 3%
Ease of use13%13%13% 13%
Features1%1%1% 1%
Hardware Support30%30%30% 30%
Available Applications26%26%26% 26%
cost/benefit ratio1%1%1% 1%
Security1%1%1% 1%
Easy development of apps3%3%3% 3%
Support by other users/companies17%17%17% 17%
Votes: 2163
goto page: prev   1  2  3 

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 not correct question

 
 by svSHiFT on: Jan 19 2004
 
Score 50%

There are several points where windows is better than Linux.
These are Hardware-Support and Application-Availability.

I wont say that windows is Easier than KDE/Linux in general -- only in fields related to hardware support (such as mounting floppies and USB-flashdrives) -- for example konq is much more easier and comfortable than IE.

dont know about cost/benefit,
look and feel, customisability, features are better in KDE/Linux.

ease-of-development in windows is unity of platform. in KDE/LINUX is QT :-)

Same about support: everyone uses WIndows, and even your heighbour can give you an advise, and regardess the great variety of Linux species, community support in Linux is no less helpfull -- though it is available only in mail-lists.


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 Hardware support

 
 by gvs on: Jan 20 2004
 
Score 50%

only if you count third-party drivers.
If hardware manufacturers didn't write windows drivers, windows hardware support would be non-existand (almost)


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 none off the above

 
 by scorpion77 on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

I voted for ease off use but was kind off looking for something else....

I think KDE has matured beautifully. It's complete, easy to use, speaks dutch ;), has great looks and so on and so on and so on. The problem is nobody is really working (hard) in making KDE part off something whole or complete. MS Windows appears to be just that, which makes it's easier to use for Joe Average.

Yes appears, because when you look under the hood you don't find much structure and logic at all! It's more a less a bit a everything not making any sense to the outsider. But for Joe Average everything is connected and there usually is only one way off doing things. And you refer to it as Windows. Simular words for MacOS X minus the lack off structure and logic not making sense :P

The average Linux distro however gives you GNU, the Linux kernel, Gnome, KDE, X and countless apps for just about anything. Great for geeks but scary as hell for Joe Average. So I really would like to see a big distro take KDE and make it part off a complete personal desktop solution, just forget about the others like Gnome, make your choise and make the best out off it! Don't just take the hard work off the opensource community put it on cd, drop it in a box and call it a distro :/


--
jb

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.

 Japanese Input

 
 by adamrice on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

I voted hardware support but only because there wasn't an option for "Japanese Input support". I know it's rather a minority requirement, but I bought a Windows laptop purely because the Japanese Input support under Linux is so painful to use. I'd say in this particular area Microsoft is 10 years ahead (and I understand that Microsoft themselves are years behind the leaders in the field). It's not really KDEs fault, but the poll said KDE/Linux so it still counts :-)


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 Re: Japanese Input

 
 by thomas12777 on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

What exactly do you mean - special kanji keyboards?
(in fact, i have no idea how to enter word sign based languages without using kinda emulation, i.e. letter based word recognation and sign conversion)


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 Re: Re: Japanese Input

 
 by adamrice on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

No, I'm talking about Japanese input methods with normal keyboards. This enables me to type something like "arigatougozaimasu" and thwack the space bar and have the correct Japanese characters appear. If the system guesses wrong what I want, I can use the space bar and arrow keys (or mouse) to select different possible representations of the syllables I typed. When it's got it right, I hit enter to finish. The basic methodology is the same on Linux and Windows, only the level of pain and ugliness differs.


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 Re: Japanese Input

 
 by Sudonix on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

Well, I use(as a learner, though :) kinput2(漢字インプットメトヅ, or whatever :), and don't find anything painful...The problem only appears when you want to mix different languages :) (e.g. my desktop - a mix of English/Russian(locale)/Japanese(occasionally))
which I solve by making a small script that would set the vars, start kinput, start the app, kill kinput. But if you're fine with having ja_JP as a global locale, there should be nothing necessary to do at all - most distros would set it all up automatically...


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 Re: Re: Japanese Input

 
 by adamrice on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

You don't find it painful that you have to restart an application to switch languages? I've written similar wrapper scripts, but I often find myself in the middle of a web browser session wanting to type just a little bit of Japanese, and I don't want to start a new browser and get back to where I was. Obviously if I was prepared to use a ja_JP locale all the time this would be less of a problem, but it would slow me down, and enough applications misbehave in multibyte locales to make it problematic. Some applications try to support Japanese input but crash a lot when they do.

In Windows I can switch input method at any time, and it works seamlessly with virtually all applications. The user interface is better, so it doesn't slow me down as much. And the conversion is just plain better. It knows more words, it makes better guesses, and it anticipates my needs better. The nail in the coffin for me was when Canna on Linux insisted on changing the hiragana "no" into a kanji _every_single_time_ I typed it. It drove me crazy.


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 Re: Re: Re: Japanese Input

 
 by Sudonix on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

Actually, here's might be what you're looking for(I mean, no global ja_JP locale and kinput2 running):
http://www.suse.de/~mfabian/suse-cjk/automatic-xim-server-start.html
It works, but it messes koi8r on the console for me.

As far as knowing more words, I think it's just a matter of installing more packages with dictionaries ;)

Anyways, yeah, this isn't particularly user-friendly for those who don't use ja_JP all the time, but then, on the other hand, I think those input methods were meant primarily for native speakers :)
Btw, speaking of that, sometimes the internationalization done at Redmond simply amazes me by its inappropriateness, lack of support(I'm 99.9% sure the Russian version of winxp needs its own, much more rare, patches) and amount of new bugs brought in(first hand experience :)

P.S. Would be interesting to know how other people handle this - maybe there's an im that just works with xkb :)) (I never really looked much)...


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 I18N, or L10N?

 
 by kichigaijin on: Feb 5 2004
 
Score 50%

The Japanese i18n is quite good, as is the Korean. I can't speak for the Chinese very well, but I've heard from colleagues that it's quite good, and they sure zipped away at it in the translation department at grad school.

By any chance did you mean the *localization*, as in the translation of visible elements on the screen (menus, etc)? Your comment on "inappropriateness" makes me think what is needed is better translators, rather than coding and input methods. Maybe I'm wrong, but as it is, Windoze has performed embarassingly better than Linux for the multilingual input I've attempted.


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 Re: Re: Japanese Input

 
 by kichigaijin on: Feb 5 2004
 
Score 50%

And therein lies the rub. Windoze blows in so many ways, but they've really taken the cake when it comes to easy multi-lingual usability. I don't know if it's KDE's issue or XFree86's, but multilingual gui input is a nightmare when you're dealing with the non-Latin character sets. I deal with the CJK (Chinese Korean Japanese) languages, and it seems the only way for me to work in more than one of these I need to log out of my desktop session ENTIRELY, and then log back in with the needed locale.



For those of you who may not catch the significance, this is entirely unacceptable from a user perspective. Sure, it gets the job done, but painfully. Part of why Windoze works the way it does in sales terms is because it has anaesthetized the painful bits, allowing users to focus on other work.



I understand there are scripting ways to go about it, but even then, I've had some trouble. Part of it is quite simply that I run my own SOHO translation business on top of a regular full-time job, so I simply don't have the time to

  1. spend hours poring over online lit to figure out the necessary parameters and scripting to change the specific variables I need changed (no, just doing LC_ALL won't work as I prefer to keep my onscreen menus etc in English, thank you), or
  2. stop everything I'm doing to log out and then log back in after changing the locale.
Heck, I even feel guilty about spending the time here online, but I figure if no one says anything, nothing will get any better, so...


Seriously, folks, some easy way of changing the input method without necessarily changing the whole locale would be very much appreciated here in linguistic geekland. The problems with Japanese input (and sjis filenames, but that's a completely separate issue) have forced me to keep using MS stuff long after I would have preferred to ditch it. I haven't the time or skills to fix this myself.


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 to contribute...

 
 by cederik on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

Hi:

I thing KDE is Better than Windows, but indeed we need make more apps for KDE, any case Linux and KDE are better than Windows...


Cederik
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 Best

 
 by fedora on: Jan 21 2004
 
Score 50%

Just one things to say:
KDE/Linux is best of the best in every way.


Linux, Don't grow up without it
Reply to this

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.

 Re: Best

 
 by Yaba on: Jan 22 2004
 
Score 50%

Well, you will get your chance to vote in the next poll ;-)


...my wife complained that I do not pay attention...or something like that...
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